Connecting Your Children with Food Part 3

Connecting-with-Kids-Part3

There is something horrifying about watching what was once recognizable food being rearranged into something that resembles… well, not food. Did you ever make those cookies with your kids that have been rolled and stabbed and dropped and iced and licked and they are just so totally gross that there is no way in the world you would ever eat them? No? O.K. maybe that was just me, but when it comes to kids, most people have watched food go from counter, to dinner plate, to garbage can faster than you can say, “No you can’t have ice cream.”

Don’t worry.

As my mother in law once told me “Kids waste a lot.” Sorry, it’s true.  In offering a variety of good choices to your child, some things will go unfinished. Offering very small amounts of new things helps but inevitably just when you think you have it knocked, that Mac and Cheese you have been depending on will suddenly be banished to “The Land Of Despised Staples” and you will be left with a plate full of abandoned noodles. Pat yourself on the back for trying and let it go. If you suffer from food remorse as you chuck the whole cheesy mess into the dogs dish, you are not alone; but sadly, you cannot mail uneaten food to where it might be better appreciated – no matter how much your kids wish you would. Remind yourself that someday when you are in charge of the universe you will arrange it so that nothing goes to waste. Meanwhile the world wobbles on, and like the Crood’s it’s your job to keep moving toward the light.

Done is done.

Having plucked my four year olds face out of her plate of green beans and carried her off to bed with bits of butter sticking to her cheek, I feel I can say with empathy, ‘It’s best to try and be reasonable about how long your child should sit at the table.’ If they have rearranged their plate, and it looks like there is less than when they started, call it progress and let them totter off. If it’s about the long haul and enjoying the ride, you can offer that broccoli (or green beans) again another day. By the time they leave for college they may even like it!

Do you have a practice that makes life easier at mealtime? Feel free to share the love. It’s cheaper than therapy and someone might even thank you for it!

Our Wild Oats bloggers are partners who love to share their passion and knowledge about better living! While we compensate them for being a part of this vibrant community, their views and opinions are their own and do not signify Wild Oats' opinions, endorsement or recommendations. Wild Oats reserves the right to moderate and remove comments that are off-topic or inappropriate, so please help us keep this community clean, fun and valuable!

2 Responses to Connecting Your Children with Food Part 3

  1. Maudie says:

    Sadly, I am still trying to connect my 20 year old and his father with food! Thank goodness the two younger ones love to eat! When I got tired of listening to my oldest son complain, I told him it was time for him to cook the family meal—-and nothing out of a box!
    After slamming the freezer door a few times and saying there was nothing to cook, he settled on home made chili! It was rather good, even though he hated cooking it.
    To my delight, my youngest had a night of his own to cook. Hotdogs in a blanket—yum, yum! He asked if he could make blueberry muffins, too. Of course I said yes, it was his night!
    Upon sitting down at the table, my husband sneared at the meal. I promptly placed food on his plate and told him he would eat it!
    Ah,my oldest son only ate part of his muffin and set it aside. I asked him why he did that. “It is too blueberry!”, he said. I glared at him and said, “Do you want to cook again tomorrow night?” To which he promptly replied, “Nope!” as he stuffed his mouth with the rest of the blueberry muffin!
    Meal time is so much fun!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Popular Tags

Email Signup

Follow Us Online

Latest Posts

Our Bloggers