Potatoes – Love the Skin They’re In

potato-skin

I recently wrote about transforming potatoes from a high-glycemic food into a more moderate and insulin-friendly food (see Falling Back In Love With Potatoes), which led to a conversation with a friend about edible skins, rinds and peels. I confess I rarely think about eating the skin of a potato, and frequently forego it altogether. It seems I’ve been missing out.

Aside from their starchy-reputation, potatoes contain an abundance of nutrients that do the body good, such as Vitamins B and C, calcium, potassium, and iron. Peel off the skin, however, and you can lose up to half of these; ounce for ounce, the skin contains more nutrients than the rest of the potato.  50% of the total antioxidant content, responsible for providing the majority of anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer benefits, are found in the skin, along with  the bulk of the fiber that is essential to slow down the digestion of starch and sugar.  T

If you don’t have time to prep and chill overnight, the fiber from the skin is even more crucial to your digestive happiness; this is also true if you are preparing a dish that calls for peeled potatoes, such as gratin or mashed potatoes.

A side note on preparation: Potatoes should always be washed thoroughly, as they are one of the crops most heavily-sprayed with pesticides and other chemicals; in fact, they show up on the Environmental Working Group’s “Dirty Dozen” list year after year. Some of the treatments applied can permeate the potato itself- scrubbing removes only 25% of these additions, and peeling only 70%. If you are concerned about exposure to pesticides and want to enjoy the skin’s many healthy attributes (or simply a baked potato), buying Organic is the best option.

For more on the subject, click the links below:

http://nutrition.answers.com/reduce-illness/phytonutrients-non-traditional-nutrients-that-keep-you-in-good-health

http://www.ewg.org/foodnews/summary.php

http://www.eatright.org/Public/content.aspx?id=6442459089

About Potatoes

Our Wild Oats bloggers are partners who love to share their passion and knowledge about better living! While we compensate them for being a part of this vibrant community, their views and opinions are their own and do not signify Wild Oats' opinions, endorsement or recommendations. Wild Oats reserves the right to moderate and remove comments that are off-topic or inappropriate, so please help us keep this community clean, fun and valuable!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Popular Tags

Email Signup

Follow Us Online

Latest Posts

Our Bloggers